Canada Climate Opinion 2013

Question:
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From what you've read and heard, is there solid evidence that the average temperature on earth has been getting warmer over the past four decades?

On map: Answered "Yes"
Instructions: Click on a province to see the regional data appear in the column on the right. You can clear your selection by clicking on the province a second time.

In the 'Results for Canada' box, you can filter the canada wide results by age group, gender or political affiliation. Use the gray drop-down list to make a selection.
Results for Canada
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Region Profile:
  • In 2011 the average per capita emissions in the Maritime provinces was 21.4 t/capita.
  • Only Newfoundland has significant hydro generation. PEI has no power generation.
  • All the provinces have a target to reduce emissions by 10% below 1990 levels by 2020.
  • In 2011 per capita emissions in Quebec were 10 t/capita, the lowest in Canada.
  • Quebec is Canada’s largest power-generating province, but almost all is produced through hydro.
  • As part of the Western Climate Initiative, Quebec launched a cap and trade system in January 2013.
  • The provincial target is to reduce emissions to 20% below 1990 levels by 2020.
  • In 2011 per capita emissions in Ontario were 12.8 t/capita, second best after Quebec.
  • Between 2003 and 2011 emissions from Ontario’s coal plants decreased by nearly 90%.
  • Coal generation will be entirely phased out this year.
  • Ontario’s Feed-in-Tariff for renewable electricity generation has been extremely controversial.
  • Together Manitoba and Saskatchewan had a 2011 per capita emissions rate of 40.1 t/capita. This masks the fact that Manitoba’s per capita rate was 15.8 t/capita (it generates 98% of its energy through hydro) while at 68.2 t/capita, Saskatechewan’s was the highest rate in the country.
  • Saskatechewan has a target to reduce GHG emissions by 20% below 2006 levels by 2020 (by setting annual reduction targets for industry).
  • Manitoba has a target of 13% below 2005 by 2020 and 50-80% below 2005 by 2050.
  • In 2011 per capita emissions in Alberta were 64.5 t/capita, second worst after Saskatchewan.
  • Almost all Canada’s projected increases in emissions to 2020 are from Alberta and from oil sands production in particular.
  • Alberta’s Specified Gas Emitters Regulation obliges companies in specific industries that emit more than 100,000 tonnes of CO2 to reduce intensity over 2004-5 levels by 12% annually or pay a $15 levy.
  • In mid 2013 there were musings that this levy might be raised to a $40 levy to achieve a 40% reduction.
  • In 2011 per capita emissions in B.C. were 12.8 t/capita.
  • British Columbia introduced a revenue neutral carbon tax in 2008 at $10/tonne. The current rate is $30/tonne.
  • B.C.’s target is to reduce GHG emissions to 33% below 2007 levels by 2020 and 80% below by 2050.
Vote and tell us what you think:

From what you've read and heard, is there solid evidence that the average temperature on earth has been getting warmer over the past four decades?